Archive for the 'Sports' Category

Hungry Sportsfans

 

As the summer heat begins to work its way across the country, the minds of men, women, and children naturally turn to the diversions of the season–family vacations, camping trips, and baseball.  Modern baseball stadiums, in an attempt to attract and keep fans, have gone far beyond the cracker jack concessions of old.  Now, baseball fans are treated to a virtual smorgasbord of food options, from the zany to the mundane.  Fortunately, the New York Times has put together a scorecard letting us know what food is worth eating at ballparks around the country.

The map is interactive, allowing users to click on a stadium they want to learn more about.  A second window pops up with picture of food to seek out and avoid, and provides descriptions of both.  Click here or on the picture above to go to the map.

In Houston’s Minute Maid Park, for instance, the map recommends the “sizzling beef fajita from Rosa’s Taqueria,” but says to avoid the Union Station “superstar dog with chili cheese.”  According to the commentary, the rubbery hot dog isn’t worth the mess you’ll be left with on your face, clothes, and fingers.

Similarly, Phillies fans should remember to try the pork and provolone sandwich from Tony Luke’s, who’s broccoli “almost makes it feel like a healthy option. Almost.”  But in an ironic bit of cultural blasphemy, the map suggests that visitors to Citizen Bank Park would do well to avoid the cheesteaks, which are apparently far below what Philadelphia’s hallmark food should be. 

The corndogs at Kansas City’s Kauffman Stadium are “disturbingly large,” and the cuban sandwich at Miami’s Dolphins Stadium has “too much neon yellow mustard.”  At Fenway Park you can apparently buy kosher hot dogs out of a vending machine (avoid), but Seattle’s Ichiroll sushi is surprisingly good for a ballpark.

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